• Disruption: Royal College of Art Research Biennial

    For our new Metalab project, Maya Oppenheimer and I are collaborating with curator Francesca Cavallo on a piece for the RCA's exhibition Disruption - it's called Rehearsing the Disaster: a para artistic work and it experiments with the interface of risk assessment, art criticism and fiction writing. The show opens on the 22nd of January!

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  • NEW ARTICLE: 'Assembling an Aesthetic'

    The new issue of Current Opinion in Chemical Biology is out and it has a special section on Aesthetics, edited by Alexandra Daisy Ginsburg with an article by me on crystallographer's models.

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  • THE ANIMATED ATOMIC

    Tomorrow I'll be giving a talk on how the 'atomic' was materialised on TV in Cold War era Britain at the Association of Art Historians' fabulous talks series Art History in the Pub.

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  • krustapseudicals featured on super/collider today!

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  • Interviewed in Dazed and Confused magazine

    My edible crystals, aka krustapseudicals, along with my take on science and art are featured in an article on Dazed Digital - click here to see it!

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  • krustapseudicals in Does Dark Matter?

    I will be cooking and serving krustapseudicals, edible crystalline morsels of cosmetic materials that purport to freeze their consumers in time, as part of the exhibition Does Dark Matter? on October 6th 2012 at 29 New Inn Yard EC2A 3EY in London, curated by cosmicmegabrain (details below).

    The krustapseudical takes its prefix from the Greek krustallos, for ice (which also lends its name to 'crystal'), while its latter half invokes the idea of ingestion for healing purposes. In particular, it references the new trend for cosmetic pharmaceuticals, or 'cosmeceuticals', and their sister product, 'nutricosmetics', pills (marketed by brands which previously only sold products like soap or skin creams), which claim to beautify the skin through internal use.

    My krustapseudicals are crystallizations of beauty advice found in magazines. They contain materials (vitamins, herbs, proteins and small edible amounts of ointments for skin and products for dental care) that are advertised as offering bodily temporal freeze - the delay or reversal of wrinkles, the 'repair' of worn hair, or a return to the luminescent skin and teeth of the young. These ingredients are formed into crystals, those prime symbols of the inorganic, a realm to which mortality and aging is unknown. This embodiment of escape from the tribulations of being part of the organic world, will be, like a vitamin or nutricosmetic, ingested by visitors. Despite their appearance, however, the krustapseudicals are far from the crystal's immortal solidity, made as they are of gelatin, the wobbly, perishable confection reserved for young children.

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    DOES DARK MATTER?

    Science. What can’t it do? Ever since its discovery, earlier this year at the T.R.I.A.L.* centre, speculation as to the implications of such a significant find has rocketed.

    The elusive science particle

    Leading figures at T.R.I.A.L. have announced that they are now only 1% uncertain that they have discovered something which very possibly could be the elusive science particle, first theorised as a possibility by leading hypotheticians. Rumours of its potential abound and vary wildly, from claims that it may heal computers, to suggestions that it may be able to banish the darkness of night. Other evidence points to it being the lego-like building blocks of everything, ever.

    None of this can be proven, of course, until experts have found a way to condense the science particle, so that it can be contained.

    In an unprecedented public presentation, T.R.I.A.L. will bring together international experts from relevant disciplines to lift the veil of bewilderment that shrouds the uninitiated. On display for the first time in history, the practitioners of the arcane new art form known as ‘Sciencism’ will re-enact the rituals that artists claim have the power to summon science. By methodical scrutiny of the evidence field they hope to unlock such mysteries as ‘ Why does “down” hurt?’ and ‘Why is every day the same, but different?” and perhaps most perplexingly ‘Does dark matter?’

    * T.R.I.A.L. is a testing ground for socio-phenomenological experiments, realised in collaboration with a broad range of specialists. By engineering spheres of engagement designed to demonstrate the effects on humanity of life’s numerous challenges, we intend to examine the forces that shape our behaviour and fundamentally forge our future. Our mission is to assemble and galvanise those who strive to understand and utilize these forces, to leverage the power of collective perceptions in an attempt to solve the bafflements of the cosmos.

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  • From Platonic Forms to Buildings that Bend

    I will be lecturing on early 3D virus models, Buckminster Fuller, and how design and science can inform each other at the University of Maryland's Geochemistry seminar series Wednesday, September 12th.

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  • 'No Signal: The Death of Snow' by Emily Candela for GUTmag

    As the UK switches to digital TV, I look back on our relationship with one of the features of the old analog system: static. Check out my article for GUTmag here.

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  • Turn it on again: June 30th

    I'm participating in this show at the end of the month, a response to the recent switchover to digital TV in the UK.

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  • LUX / ICA Biennial of Moving Images

    I will be giving a talk at the LUX / ICA Biennial of Moving Images at the end of May called 'No signal: Failures of transmission in the moving image from analog ‘snow’ to the ‘blue screen of death’'...

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